Welcome to Frontiers Winter 2016 – Into the Unknown

Welcome to the Winter 2016 issue of Frontiers. We come to the end of our second year as a publication: a year which has been wrenching in many respects, extreme changes in the political landscape have made the certainties of our society feel a lot less so. It feels at the end of 2016 as if all of our cards are up in the air and we are waiting to see how they fall. This uncertainty comes in tandem with the ‘end of an era’ for some of the Frontier’s writing team, as they qualify as psychotherapists and leave the warm and comfortable institutional protection of college to begin the journey of creating a private practice out in the world.

as well as the potential new worlds which we might uncover by losing sight of the old shore, we also hold a fear of potential monsters that lurk beneath uncharted waters as we voyage

ship-mistPartnered alongside uncertainty almost as it’s dark twin, there is inevitably some element of fear that accompanies it- as well as the potential new worlds which we might uncover by losing sight of the old shore, we also hold a fear of potential monsters that lurk beneath uncharted waters as we voyage. For that reason we have decided to base this issue on the twin theme of the unknown and fear – two words which might resonate with many at the end of 2016

 

We begin with an article by Suzie Chick, who writes about the experience of changing from a know-it-all into someone who is comfortable with uncertainty and the freedom that this gives her . This is followed by Kelly Hearn who writes on ‘living on the edge’ of your comfort zone, and dealing with the fear that comes from leaving this safe space for something new. Next we have an article by Cristina Preda, who talks about befriending dementia – facing and processing the fear that she felt whilst volunteering in a dementia ward.

I follow this with a review of one of James Hillman’s last books before his passing – ‘a Terrible Love of War’, a book which reflects one of societies ever present fears around uncertainty, that of the threat of conflict. Suzie also reviews the film ‘Blurred Lines’ with some reflections on narrative therapy. Finally we have our dilemmas page, which this issue deals with dual relationships and a selected poem, the Clearing.

We hope you enjoy reading and that we find a new shore rather than monsters in 2017

Nick Opyrchal (editor)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s